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Brittany B. Talks Stepping From Behind The Scenes, Her New Record Featuring 24Hrs, The State of R&B, Her Upcoming EP, & More With Live Civil

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From an early age, singer-songwriter Brittany B. always knew she wanted a career in music. Growing up in Compton, California, she recalls being an 8-year-old entertainer who not only became a regular performer at school talent shows, but would perform songs by Destiny’s Child during recess, a group in which she credits as being one of her most cherished musical influences.

“I knew at a very young age that I wanted to pursue music as a career,” Brittany B. recalls. “I had to be about 8 years old and I remember singing to my friends at recess. They would say “you have a great voice, sing to us,” so I would sing Destiny’s Child songs to them. I actually went to the military briefly, but was discharged. Even when I was in basic camp, I would sing and everyone would tell me I didn’t belong there — that I belonged on stage.”

 

According to an article published on Genius, Brittany B.’s first break came in 2011 when she worked on Grammy-nominated musician Terrace Martin’s album, ‘Locke High 2’, and contributed to his track “Love,” featuring Ty Dolla $ign. Since then it seems that Brittany B.’s career as an artist has only elevated as she went on to sign a publishing deal with Spirit Music Group and earned writing credits on Theophilus London’s “Can’t Stop,” featuring Kanye West. Other collaborations include artists such as John Legend, Eric Bellinger, Chrisette Michele, Ledisi, and Bhad Babie, whose Brittany B. assisted track “These Heaux” peaked at No. 77 on Billboard’s Hot 100 — making Bhad Babie the youngest female rapper to chart on Billboard. After spending most of her career behind-the-scenes, writing for different artists, and becoming a Grammy-nominated songwriter herself, Brittany B. is ready to step into the spotlight to tell her own story.

“I have so many experiences that I want to share through my music with everyone so that they can understand where I’ve come from and where I’m going in my life,” she says.

 

We caught up with Brittany B. to discuss what makes now the perfect time to step from behind the scenes, the state of R&B, advice she would offer to an aspiring artist, her new record featuring 24 Hrs., and what we can expect from her upcoming EP. Check out what she had to say below.

 

When did you realize you wanted a career in the music industry?

I knew at a very young age that I wanted to pursue music as a career. I had to be about 8 years old and I remember singing to my friends at recess. They would say “you have a great voice, sing to us,” so I would sing Destiny’s Child songs to them. I performed at all the school talent shows and always knew I would be an artist. I actually went to the military briefly, but was discharged. Even when I was in basic camp, I would sing and everyone would tell me I didn’t belong there — that I belonged on stage.

 

I read that Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, Mary J. Blige, and Destiny’s Child serves as your most cherished influences in music. Is there any one of the newer or younger generation that you have also been inspired by?

Billie Ellish, H.E.R., and Daniel Ceasar have really inspired me as well. They have all mastered one of the key qualities an artist must have — authenticity.

 

After spending years behind-the-scenes writing for different artists, what made you want to begin pursuing and focusing on your own music career — or becoming “the face of your own words” so to speak?

I just feel that this is the moment in my life when I can tell my story the right way, with the right team, and in a time where I really have a lot to say. I have so many experiences that I want to share through my music with everyone so that they can understand where I’ve come from and where I’m going in my life. I’ve worked behind the scenes for a long time and now I feel like I can finally step into the forefront.

 

 

You have a new record called “Good For It” featuring 24 Hrs., which I love by the way. What was the inspiration behind this record?

The record is a blend of my new sound with my feelings about love. Where are the men who want a ride or die woman? I just wanted to bring that aspect back to music in a cool way. There’s so much music about being single, turning up, and “taking someone’s man.” I wanted to talk to the women who wanna be cuffed and who are loyal. I’m so happy that twenty hopped on the record too because his lyrics are just as important as mine. He talked about impressing his girl and never doing her wrong. Those lyrics are super important for this time in Hip-Hop where men are saying the complete opposite and women are praising “scammin’ a man”.

 

It seems as though R&B doesn’t get as much love and support as it once did in the ’90s and maybe early 2000’s. The genre is noticeably absent or not as widely represented on the radio, awards shows, and mainstream music in general, with the exception of maybe one or two hot new artists here and there. As a singer-songwriter, what is your opinion on the current state of R&B?

R&B will never go away. It’s always present however right now it’s not the dominant genre. Hip-Hop is more dominant right now, but that doesn’t mean that R&B disappeared. There’s a lot of artists blending both sounds. I feel like every genre will get its time to be the “popular,” so I think R&B artists shouldn’t change to fit in. The most successful R&B artists were the ones who stayed true to their sound and core fan base. I think R&B is actually becoming more popular than ever and emerging due to the over saturation of the Hip-Hop culture. Basically, people want to hear something different; they wanna feel different.

 

If you could offer a piece of advice — one ‘do’ and ‘don’t’ — to an aspiring artist looking to break into the music industry, what would that advice be?

Do stay true to yourself. Be authentic. Always do what you feel is right regardless of popular opinion.

Don’t take the first offer or opportunity that comes your way out of fear. Know your worth and then add tax

 

Where are you as far as the completion of your ‘Bossed Up’ EP — and what can we expect from the project?

I have over 50 songs recorded, but I still feel like I’m not done yet. I want this EP to be impactful and really speak to the independent women. You can expect boss bitch anthems and real records. I also want to showcase all of my talent — my writing, singing, and rapping. So make sure to stay locked in via social media, @brittanybmusic.

 

XOXO
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